GLOBALIZATION IN INDONESIA

by 11:24 AM 0 COMMENTS

One of the main arguments for globalization is that it's improving the lives of people in poor counties. Sure, developed nations are losing jobs, but it is lifting up the most impoverished people on the planet. That sounds nice, but like most of the claims of the globalists, it is a lie. There are many examples we could use to point out this lie, but none is clearer than Indonesia.

For some time I have been perplexed as to why Indonesia is poor. I know a few Indonesian people and have found them to be exceptionally intelligent and hard working. Their culture is one that should breed success. With a booming population (the 4th largest in the world) they have no shortage of labor resources. They have an ideal location with many ports to both the Pacific and Indian oceans. When it comes to natural resources they are one of the richest countries on earth. On paper they should be a major rising economy competing with China and India, but they remain poor. What is the reason for this? Their nation has been enslaved by the globalists.

Globalization began over four decades ago, in Indonesia. America's post WWII boom was ending. Unions and government red tape were driving down the profits of many western companies. Like many countries in Asia, Indonesia was recovering from years of colonial exploitation and a brutal Japanese occupation during WWII.

Suharto
In 1968, military strong man Suharto (with western backing) took control of the country. He would rule for the next 32 years. During this time, over one million people were killed; mass graves are still being found.

While Suharto had the backing of several western nations; it was his ties with central banks and large corporations that secured his power. Companies such as Nike entered Indonesia and opened large factories employing thousands, with slave wages. Suharto's strong arm kept the workers in line and silent.

To the outside world, Indonesia's economy appeared to be prospering. However, the prosperity was not real; it was actually being driven by billions in loans from the IMF and World Bank. Meanwhile, Suharto and his family were secretly funneling 30% of the loans into their own private bank accounts. After Suharto and his family were overthrown, the banks still demanded their money, with large amounts of interest.

George Soros
This is a blog that leans heavily to the right. I despise the political views and projects or George Soros, but that is not what this is about. George Soros has actually done some incredibly evil things, he should have been imprisoned. Nowhere has he done more harm than in Indonesia.

You may have heard about how Soros made billions by short selling and collapsing the Malaysian currency, he did the same thing in other places. In Malaysia he devalued the currency 15%; in Indonesia he devalued it by 25%. Suddenly the cost of living shot through the roof, while the international corporations refused to increase wages. The people became angry and rose up against the government of Suharto. However, the central banks (that were actually running the country) replaced Suharto with a new front man.

In the aftermath the nation found itself in deep debt, being lead by politicians that have been bought off by the banks and international corporations. To this day, George Soros is regarded as a hero of the little man by western media outlets. He even has the audacity to lecture Indonesia about what it needs to do to become a part of the global economy.

Sadly, I don't think the worst is behind Indonesia. I think the artificially created world food shortages will soon be having a large impact on that nation. I would not be surprised to see the government overthrown, and Western governments under the guise of a humanitarian mission set up permanent military operations there. Its strategic location would make it a great value to the military industrial complex.

It could never happen here, right?
This is what globalization does. It takes power from the people and consolidates it into the hands of select elite. It started in poor nations, and it's spreading to the rich nations. We see them inflating our currency and driving up the cost of living. We see them passing laws and taxes that destroy small businesses, while they give trillions in bailouts to the banks and large corporations. It’s time to wake up! If we do not, Indonesia's past will become our future.



Parnell Tator

Developer

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