THE FORGOTTEN WAR

by 6:25 AM 0 COMMENTS

Most people my age are taught little about the Korean War. Growing up, the main source for my knowledge on the subject was (sadly) from M*A*S*H. Korea does not get near the attention (in America) that WWII and Vietnam receive. In Korea, it is a different story. Here, it is not referred to as the Korean War; it is referred to as THE WAR.


Most of us, have a relative or know someone who served in Korea, during the war. I wish they could all come here and spend a month to see the society that they fought to protect. Today South Korea is thriving. It has become, the land of high speed internet and engineering marvels. The standard of living in South Korea is as high as any western nation. The people are blessed with freedom of speech, and property rights. In fact, I think protesting may be more popular than Kim Chi.

Nowhere, are the results of what was fought for more clear. Do a Google search for satellite images of Korea at night. You will see the cities of the south lit up. In the north the lights are few and far between. The average South Korean is several inches taller than the average North Korean. This is not from some genetic difference; this is because South Koreans eat like Americans, while North Koreans often go hungry.

We have interesting stories made public from people that have visited the north. One man who was staying in Pyongyang, looked out of his hotel window at night; and saw people walking backwards in the dark. Every few minutes a single person or a small group of people would pass by, walking backward. Apparently, the North Koreans have a belief that walking backward is very healthy. Nowhere, can we see the results of Marxism more clear, than North Koreans walking backward in the dark.

While many in America may have forgotten the sacrifice our men made in the war; the Korean people remember. While many nations were involved in the war, America lost more good men than any allied nation. They went together with their brothers from the South, in liberation, not conquest.

I came to Korea almost two years ago, and am scheduled to leave soon. I was so pleased when I received orders here. I wanted to serve against the forces of Marxism. I wanted to experience the Korean culture. While here, I have been privileged on many occasions, to work with the Korean Navy. I will never forget the things we accomplished together.

Many, who served in the Korean War, have no idea what impact they had. Those who did not make it home, did not die in vain. They live on; when a newly wed South Korean couple sits together for an evening meal, in peace. They live on; when a South Korean family sits together in church. They live on; in the hearts and minds of the Korean people.







Parnell Tator

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